Sunday, 1 May 2016

Juicy greens + pink tulip video

It's not a secret that my favourite color is green. Therefore, the painting that I'm working on now is very pleasing to my eyes. I finished hairy rambutans and I moved on. My next step was this fascinating fourth instar caterpillar of the Giant Atlas Moth. I've seen many photos and videos of this moth life cycle and I can honestly say that it's absolutely amazing. One of my favourite videos is made by Adam Grochowalski from Poland and you can watch it here if you like.

The fourth instar caterpillar is covered with white powder. Firstly, I painted the whole caterpillar and then I used white tempera to add powder on its body.


I placed eggs on the leaves and I masked it with masking fluid. This way I was able to paint the leaves without worrying about the little round shapes. Three days last with masking fluid on the paper and I took it off from one egg just to see whether I would have a problem or not. It came off easily without tearing the paper so I left the rest of it just in case. I'll come back to them when I finish the leaves.


Basically, I'm using three greens here:
1) Permanent Sap Green (PG36, PY110, Winsor&Newton)
2) a mix of Permanent Sap Green and Quinacridone Gold (PO49, Daniel Smith)
3) a mix of those from point 2 + French Ultramarine to make it darker. 


My three favourite and basic greens are Winsor Green (Blue Shade and Yellow Shade) and Permanent Sap Green. I use them as my base to make other greens. I like to add French Ultramarine or Winsor Red Deep to make them darker. I also love Quinacridone Gold in my green mixes. I've found it makes beautiful greens with blues.  


Here is a little tip. I don't have a brush holder and usually I lay my brush on a tissue but I noticed that the bristles sometimes deform. I took a little cardboard box in which I kept my business cards and cut out triange shapes on both sides. Now my brushes are laying still and the bristles are straight. 


I also made a video of a pink tulip lately. You can see it on my YouTube channel if you like (click here).




7 comments:

  1. Another very helpful blog post. Your caterpillar is juicy! Thanks for all you share, you teach people alot.

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    1. Thank you very much Fiona and you're very welcome! :) I saw your gallery and I really like it! I've added your website to my bookmarks :)

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  2. Thank you for the interesting color mix part and the brush holder looks like a cool idea.

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    1. You're very welcome! Thank you for the comment :)

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  3. Wow! Love them all and the brushrest is ingenious.
    Daniel Smith makes a Primatek colour called Green Apatite, which is a really lovely green. Jane Blundell loves it. Try Jane Blundell.com
    My favourite green is a Daniel Smith Primatek pure mineral colour called Diopside. It has to be seen to be believed. It is made from a precious stone of the same name, and in mass tone looks like a very deep, but not dark Sap Green, and it goes right through many gorgeous tones with some lovely undertones.
    David.

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    1. I also love Daniel Smith's Green Apatite Genuine, but I'm concerned that granulating colors are not really compatible with very realistic paintings. I'm going to start doing more landscapes to take advantage of my paints that have texture in them. I also really love Daniel Smith's Rose of Ultramarine, Cascade Green, and Undersea Green. These colors all have serious dimension.

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    2. Thanks for the information David! I had a sample chart from Daniel Smith (these paints are pretty new here in Poland) and I also like Green Apatite very much. I tried to buy it, but it was not available here, the same goes with Diopside. I love them both! I love all greens.

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